In Alabama, Clinton goes after Republicans on voting rights

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke Saturday during a meeting of the Alabama Democratic Conference in Hoover, Ala.

In Alabama, Clinton goes after Republicans on voting rights – The Boston Globe

 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke Saturday during a meeting of the Alabama Democratic Conference in Hoover, Ala.

Clinton criticized Alabama’s Republican governor, Robert Bentley, for closing driver’s license offices in 31 counties, many of them majority African-American. Alabama requires photo identification to vote.

Neither her criticisms nor her positions were new. But the venue offered her a chance to champion voting rights to an important constituency.

Alabama is among almost a dozen states extending from Virginia to Texas that are scheduled to vote early in the nominating process in 2016. In a number of those states — Alabama, South Carolina, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana — blacks could make up a majority or close to a majority of the Democratic primary electorate.

The front-loaded Southern schedule is actually a byproduct of Republicans’ domination in the region. GOP leaders wanted their constituents, nearly all of them white conservatives, to have greater influence in choosing the Republican nominee.

Southern black voters are a constituency Clinton has cultivated for decades and addressed effortlessly as she dropped local references into her remarks and spoke about people she had met in the area as far back as the 1980s.

Clinton invoked President Obama, praising his economic stewardship, along with that of her husband, Bill Clinton.

‘‘I’m not running for my husband’s third term or President Obama’s third term,’’ she said. ‘‘I’m running for my first term, but I’m going to do what works.’’

Source: In Alabama, Clinton goes after Republicans on voting rights – The Boston Globe


 

One comment

  • Alabama has always been the keystone of voter discrimination; requiring preclearance when changing any segment of the voting rights law/act. The Act contains several specific prohibitions on conduct that may interfere with a person’s ability to cast an effective vote; according to the list of jurisdictions under the original formula within the 1965 Voting Rights Act. As of June 25, 2013, the United States Supreme Court held that it is unconstitutional to use the coverage formula in Section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act to determine which jurisdictions are subject to the preclearance requirement of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, Shelby County v. Holder, 133 S. Ct. 2612 (2013). Once the ruling when into play the Southern States started changing voting requirements in a way of restricting people’s rights. The Supreme Court did not rule on the constitutionality of Section 5 itself. The effect of the Shelby County decision is that the jurisdictions identified by the coverage formula in Section 4(b) no longer need to seek preclearance for the new voting changes, unless they are covered by a separate court order entered under Section 3(c) of the Voting Rights Act. ~ Wikipedia and About Section 5. We need to correct this ruling starting with Alabama.